About your Search

20130121
20130129
STATION
CSPAN 4
KQED (PBS) 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
MSNBC 2
SFGTV2 2
CNN 1
CNNW 1
CSPAN2 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
MSNBCW 1
WBAL (NBC) 1
WBFF (FOX) 1
WETA 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 37
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
started it in 2007 with harry reid to block george w. bush. george w. bush never challenged this. >> correct. and in fact, george w. bush's lawyers wrote recently in the newspapers that this is presidential power. the constitution gives the president the power to make recess appointments. and they are undermining. >> that is really not in dispute. what is in dispute here is whether the senate was actually in recess and the question comes who gets to decide whether the senate is in recess? the senate or the president? >> and i think the oath -- you also have to put this in broader context. >> things got done during that -- >> they weren't in town. they weren't in town. you could not consider a nomination because they weren't here. >> the thing about this, though, put it in broader context. the more interesting aspect of the ruling was them dialing this way, way back and saying in fact if you look at the constitution you can't even if you are a president hold out the recess appointments and then make them finally put them forward when the senate is in recess. the recess has to happ
, george w. bush. another poll shows since president obama was re-elected, just a third of voters think he has been more bipartisan. but the majority, 55% say he's been more confrontational. does this mean nothing can really get done that's meaningful in washington to solve our nation's national debt and help the economy? we have a former white house political director under president george w. bush and a former chief of staff to west virginia senator joe mansion. >> great to be here. >> eric: matt, let me start with you. how do we get here? >> well, you know, i think about the president i served, george w. bush. when he came to office, he really was concerned about trying to if i understand a way to reach across the aisle because clearly bill clinton left the presidency with high numbers. he worked with ted kennedy. he worked with democrats and signature domestic policy issues and then 9/11 happened and the wars occurred. really, the nation polarized again, right versus left. i don't think we have come out of that. obama inherited that. but he talked about bridging that and governing in a
: the democrats. >> no, democrats -- >> democrats started it in 2007 with harry reid, blocking george w. bush. george w. bush never challenged this. >> correct and, in fact, george w. bush's lawyers wrote recently in the newspapers, that this is presidential power, the constitution gives the president the power to make recess appointments. >> chris: juan, i want to -- >> that is not in dispute. what is in dispute here, is whether the senate was actually in recess and the question comes, who gets to decide whether the senate is in recess? the senate? or the president? >> a sham... >> and, in the broader context, there are things -- >> -- things done during that -- >> they weren't in town, they could not consider the nomination because they were not here. >> but it in broader context, the more interesting aspect of the ruling was them dialing it way, way back and saying, in fact if you look at the constitution, you can't even, if you are a president, hold out the recess appointments, and, then make them finally put them forward when senate is in recess. the recess actually has to happen while t
in the backroom deals -- >> even movements can be cloistered. i remember a dinner during the george w. bush administration in southern california. it was norman lear and his wife, larry david, bob scheer. they were sitting around w eeping in their expensive soup about the fact that we were living in hell. rupert murdoch on the media. george bush was president. norman lear had his pulse on american culture for 30 years. why cannot figure out how to deal -- deliver a message that is important and happening? >> that is important. we can find messages that speak to people where they are. they can also have some satire like stewart or colbert. there is the idea of exposing with satire. it opens people's eyes to the hypocrisy and corruption of our politics. the problem is you want the captivating stories and images and vocabulary, but a lot of the colbert-stewart stuff is so absurd and over the top that people do not want to get engaged. >> that is where a large number of people get their news. >> i think the obama campaign was a pivotal point, bringing people in. now they leave. there is the pos
. >>> and elizabeth bush is running for congress in south carolina. she is not related to george w. bush but she is related to comedian stephen colbert. that's his sister. she may be getting a little free tv time. what do you think? that is your morning dish of scrambled politics. >>> a series of gun show accidents, bash bra walters medical condition and video of man versus shark you don't want to miss. >>> plus, how has president obama impacted the country during his first four years in office? we'll reveal surprising statistics. it's all next on "first look." ♪ [ male announcer ] how do you turn an entrepreneur's dream... ♪ into a scooter that talks to the cloud? ♪ or turn 30-million artifacts... ♪ into a high-tech masterpiece? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. my ex-girlfriend... 7th grade math teacher. who is this? that's pete. my... [ dennis' voice ] allstate agent. a "starving artist" has an allstate agent? he got me... [ dennis' voice ] the allstate value plan. it's their most affordable car insurance and you still get
and that the united states is not engaged. >> look at george w. bush. in 2000 he said he would have a restrained, humble foreign policy. then 9/11 hit. and now we've been dealing with wars for over a decade. we have already made reference to it while the chinese have been investing in africa. we've been dropping bombs in iraq. we are now in afghanistan. 12 years in. $2 billion a week. our defense budget keeps exploding. so an iranian crisis comes at the absolute worst time for this country. >> that's what i was saying early on. >> on so many points. >> things could change dramatically this year. >> richard and i have talked about this a lot. in search of a metaphor, have i been thinking about the islamic role in africa and the middle east, think of it size a large, very dry forest after years of drought. and a lightning strike anywhere, which is unanticipated, starts a brush fire. and then it goes across. we just saw what happened in algeria. what's going on in syria at the moment. and we are not dealing state-to-state. there's an entirely new set of rules for dealing with that critical part of
he was the one who asked george w. bush at a press conference whether he had -- were there any mistakes he wanted to do over in his presidency and bush couldn't think of one. it was a really interesting moment and that was because of the question that he had asked. i don't think he's given to making wild statements at all. >> it wasn't sort of a gaffe at the-- on the fly, it was in a 2000 word piece. >> i'll say there's a school of thoughts right now among democrats that the way for president obama to win now is essentially to put his boot on the neck of republicans and try to just, you know, completely destroy them. >> well, that's you said the school of thought within the democrats. is it the school of thought within cbs news or john dickerson or the media? >> i can't tell what you they're thinking, but certainly there are a number of opinion journalists who agree with this. >> is he an opinion journalist? >> no, the political director of cbs, but also by the way, rights for slate and the article was in slate and prides itself on being edgy and interesting and saying a little
george w. bush. he's currently a senior adviser at the united states institute of peace. welcome to both of you. first, zbigniew brzezinski, your thoughts on john kerry as nominee for secretary of state? >> i think he's an absolutely top-notch choice. very good. experienced, solid, energetic with a broad vision and with a strong focus on trying to stabilize those parts of the world that are especially dangerous. i think he's practical, intelligent, well informed. >> brown: stephen hadley? >> he's in a way spent his whole life preparing for this job and it's good he did because he takes in the a very challenging time and i think he's going to have a lot of challenges before him. i think one of them is to prioritize where he's going to put his time. >> brown: well, you know, he spoke about the economy, getting the economy right first and foremost. he said "more than ever foreign policy is economic policy." did that sound right to you? >> i think that's right and i think this is a man who's grown up, really, in the political military side of foreign policy and national security and i think
in 2012. that was down from john mccain got 31% in 2000 and he lost. george w. bush proved the point. the republicans need to get about 40% or more to win a race for president. this isn't just about the presidency. look at a couple of senate races from 2012 right here. in the state of florida, democrats nearly 6 in 10 latino votes. in virginia, 62%. in arizona, 74%. we can go state, by state, by state. democrats sometimes above 60% in the latino vote. you look at the demographics. republicans can't sustain themselves. let's look at the house races. in 2012, 68%. again, nearly 7 in 10 latinos vote democratic. that's matching the numbers from 2008. 70% 7 70%. in 2004, it was 66%. yes, there are policy questions. senator mccain was honest enough to say, a lot of this being dictated by election results. >> the senate looks like they're working on a bipartisan way for comprehensive immigration reform. it's moving along in the senate. what about the house of representatives? >> i wouldn't get too far out ahead of yourself and say this will pass the house but there is clear changes under wa
me now the former deputy assistant to george w. bush and julie, an assistant to frank lautenberg, what a powerful voice. >> powerful, reasoned, common sense approach from a man who has everything to be bitter about. i'm a victim of gun violence almost kidnapped when i was 18, a shootout at the house, the two guys who perpetrated the crime against me and my mom didn't have legal guns. and my position on gun control is the same as mr. mattioli, he has a harder cross to bear, he lost his son james, i'm here, but a cautioned reasoned common sense approach to gun control is where america should be. we have enough laws, he's right. we don't have the enforcement that we need and also he spoke to mental health. the people who perpetrate these crimes are mentally ill in most cases and criminal, and need help before they act out. >> megyn: nothing else, it should add to the debate. so many in favor of gun control have been somewhat dismissive of the other side and their motives, you know, even the president has suggested that those who gin up fears about this are after ratings or revenue.
publication. john dickerson was credited with being the guy who knocked george w. bush off his heels the most times during his presidency. it's not surprising to me, though, that there is a conflict of interest here. do we remember during the election when there were reporters caught off mic before mitt romney made his statement? cbs news reporter, jan crawford, was one of those reporters. so clearly there is a problem at cbs of there being biased in their reporting. but as we've seen throughout the years, it's not surprising. >> steve: so this is clearly, in your estimation, an example, glaring example of liberal media bias? >> i think it is. and at least with mr. dickerson, he is honest about, in his biothat he's work for slate and the cbs political director. but -- >> steve: how do you do both? >> that's the question. i mean, if cbs is going to portray themselves as a middle of the road, unbiased news source, then it seems a little strange that you would have someone who is writing regularly for a far left publication, as the political director. i think that we saw that with the election r
over how to deal with the george w. bush tax cuts. the house wanted them all extended for everybody. democrats are never on board. president obama was never going to be on board with the idea. so john boehner struggled in that situation, even coming up with an alternative plan for extending tax breaks for anyone making less than $1 million a year. he had to pull from the courthouse. so that was. a was. the next day, he also -- not the next day. excuse me, on january 1, they came back and finally agreed to raise tax rates for those incomes of people making $400,000 a year. that was a tough bill and proposal for him to put forward to, just because taxes went up at the end of the day. the next day he came back and decided to not have a vote on the sandy relief package. that made house lawmakers angry in the northeast. governor chris christie of new jersey also had some tough words for him. he pulled the proposal because conservative republicans said the bill was loaded with pork with projects not related to the storm and they should've gone through the normal appropriations process. a
that that money is being effectively used to address certain things. george w. bush, i give him significant credit for the that far -- because they have set a certain standard, that these are our values, these are our standards, if you are able to enforce and implement those standards, we will provide you that support. there are some very good success stories there. it is a difficult climate with which to go back home and tell people that it works and it is and our national interest and we have a moral commitment on some of the tragic things that are happening, for example nutrition and disease and so forth. but as we see what is happening now in africa, and the threats there any changes that are taking place, africa suddenly has become a place where we have more interest. chuck was deputy secretary -- i got my acronyms maxed -- mixed up. he spent a lot of time looking at africa from the standpoint of his position in europe, kind of foreshadowing what was to come. and pleading, i think, for engagement in dealing with what was happening there. now we are seeing some of the consequences of all of th
supported ronald reagan when he sent troops out. i supported george h. w. bush when he sent troops to panama. i supported president clinton when against the will of the congress, he did what was needed to be done in bosnia, closet vow, and so forth. and in this particular instance, i think the president behaviored in that tradition. >> i would argue that the constitution has no exceptions for when you're having a tough time or people disagree with you that you go ahead and do it. >> in the early 1970s affiliate vietnam you were critical of the bombing in cambodia. i think you felt it wasn't authorized by congress. has your opinion changed about the bombing in cambodia? how is cambodia different than libya? >> nor did my opinion change or has it ever altered about the war itself where i don't believe, and i argued that. >> was cambodia different than libya? >> yeah, it was. it was an extension of the war being prosecuted without the involvement of congress after a number of years. that's very different. >> length of time. but similar circumstances bombing campaign unthorszed by congress. the
on it immediately. i supported ronald reagan when he sent troops into grenada. i supported george h.w. bush when he sent troops into panama. i supported president clinton, when, against the will of the congress, he did what was needed to be done in kosovo and bosnia and so forth. in this case, i think the president has behaved in that tradition. >> i would argue the constitution doesn't have an exception -- that when you are having tough times, the constitution says that you just go ahead and do it. after vietnam, you were quite critical of the bombing in cambodia because you felt that it was not authorized by congress. has your opinion changed about the bombing in cambodia? how is cambodia different from libya? >> my attitude has not changed about vietnam itself. >> what about cambodia? >> it was the extension of a war prosecuted without the involvement of congress after a number of years. that is very different. >> length of time, but similar circumstances. and obama campaign and authorized by congress. it is not this kind of latitude to sometimes go to war and to sometimes not go to war. i thoug
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)